Appointments Only Edina, MN 55435 612-217-2277

Where do your cars come from?
How do you sell cars so cheaply?
When is the best time to buy a used car?
Has your car ever been in an accident?
Will you take “x” dollars for it?
Where can I see your cars?
Why do I have to make an appointment to see a car?
Do you take trades?
What is my “out the door price”?
Why does the service agreement company want me to bring my car to an independent shop for repair instead of the dealer?
Is buying new or used the best way to save money?<
What about “certified” vehicles?
My Car Broke Down and I Need a Car Today. What Should I Do?<

Where do your cars come from?
A huge majority of our cars come from the same place that most new car dealers get any car that has less than 40,000 miles. They are program cars gotten at factory sales. So what does this mean for you? This means that you can know that our cars are the same quality vehicles that you would expect to find at your local new car dealer with one big difference. Like most big dealers we have hundreds of cars for sale but we don’t have the overhead of a parking lot full of cars like the traditional dealer. By only showing cars by appointment we save our customers hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars over the old fashioned wheeler-dealership.

How do you sell cars so cheaply?
Alliance has a lot of advantages over the traditional used car dealer. To summarize we have extremely low overhead (I have the paycheck stub to prove it , we are able to buy cars counter cyclically, and despite our best efforts at avoiding becoming “used car salesmen” we really are used car experts.

When is the best time to buy a used car?
Right now (fall of 08) Why? Because car rental companies aren’t as busy so there are more used cars available especially after their having infleeted the 09′s that they over estimated their need for. Also, the manufacturers aren’t selling as many so their prices have gone down and when new car prices go down used ones usually go down slightly more.

Here is what I thought for the last year until this fall:
For what it’s worth I understand the availability of fleet vehicles is expected get worse before it gets better. I’m told the manufacturers are cutting the number of cars they sell to fleets. To me this would explain the steep increase in vehicle prices over the last six months or so (although it could be a seasonal shift that is back in play finally since 9/11). In any case I can tell the prices of used cars are going up a lot lately. If prices mellow out it will usually be in November. That’s normally the best time of year to by non-4×4 cars.

I’m not trying to talk you into seeing things my way. I just like people to be informed. You can do your own soothsaying based on your own situation. We might very well still have one the vehicle you’re looking for in the future too. Unfortunately though, if we don’t have any of the vehicles bought during the less expensive time in the past we’ll be selling cars, trucks and vans that we bought in the higher priced market.

Has your car ever been in an accident?
Almost never. Alliance avoids buying cars that have had previous body work. Most of our cars are bought at factory auctions which helps avoid surprises by holding the manufacturer responsible for undesirable histories because Toyota, GM, Ford, etc. don’t want their dealers having problems that will affect their reputation. We agree.

Will you take “x” dollars for it?
Alliance always gives you the best price available for every car for sale. You’ll find the same low price whether you research it online or show up (tisk-tisk) unannounced. We don’t believe in playing games. We believe that everyone, no matter how new to buying cars, should get a great deal every time. Without doing it this way we couldn’t sleep good at night.

Where can I see your cars?
Why do I have to make an appointment to see a car?
With multiple locations throughout the metro our cars’ locations and availability vary hourly. Calling first for an appointment is the best way to conveniently find the best car for your needs.

Do you take trades?
We can make you an offer on your vehicle. Frankly though, trading in a vehicle is not usually the cheapest way to “sell” a car but it can save you a lot of grief plus some money in taxes. So yes, we take trades.

What is my “out the door price”?
To calculate your “out the door” price estimate $8.50-$15 per month for plates 6.65% tax, a $50 documentation fee and about $25 for title transfer. Add in the price of the car and you’re all set. For out of state sales call for details because usually only the $50 dollar doc. fee is applicable but your home state taxes and fees also probably apply and will be collected when you title it there.

Why does the service agreement company want me to bring my car to an independent shop for repair instead of the dealer?
In short, because dealers charge more. Just like in car sales they have more overhead so they have to charge more for cars and repairs. Don’t take our word for it though. Check out what Click and Clack from National Public Radio have to say about it.

Is buying new or used the best way to save money?
Because driving a new car off the lot instantly costs the owner 10-15% of the value of the vehicle it seems obvious that used cars are the way to go. But don’t take our word for it. USA Today Kelley Blue Book® agree. The single most expensive part of owning a car is its loss in value over time (depreciation). According to USA Today® and Kelley® Blue Book new cars can lose as much as >73% in just three years. The same sources state that at best a three year old vehicle may retain just over 60% of it’s value.

Some of the benefits of buying a used car are:

  • Used cars cost less from the start.
  • Less interest is paid as a result of the lower price.
  • Lower taxes and plate fees: Both the sales tax paid and the tabs will be less on a used vehicle.
  • Lower insurance premiums.
  • Lower depreciation: The previous owner of the vehicle has already paid for a large portion of the vehicle.
  • New car owners who have a car totalled out as a result of an accident usually owe more on their vehicle than its worth and end up with car payments but no car.

What about “certified” vehicles?
“Certified” vehicles are an interesting concept. Until January 1st, 2008 there was no industry or legal standard for what constitutes “certified”. So, one person’s “certified” was another’s average used car. Since the change in law there are now a handful of requirements for certified vehicles.

The law prohibits a dealer from advertising or selling a used car or light truck using the word, “certified” or similar descriptive term if the dealer knows or should know that:

  • The odometer on the vehicle does not indicate actual mileage, has been rolled back or otherwise altered to show fewer miles, or has been replaced with an odometer showing fewer miles that actually driven;
  • The vehicle was reacquired by the vehicle’s manufacturer or a dealer pursuant to state or federal warranty laws;
  • The title to the vehicle has been inscribed with the notation “damaged,” “flood,” “junk,” “lemon law buyback,” “manufacturer repurchase,” “nonrepairable,” “rebuilt,” “reconditioned,” “salvage,” or similar title designation required by this state or another state;
  • The vehicle has sustained damage in an impact, fire, or flood, that substantially impairs its use or safety; or
  • The vehicle has sustained frame damage.

The law requires the dealer to inspect any vehicle labeled as “certified” and requires the dealer to provide the buyer with a completed inspection report indicating all the components inspected. The law does not provide any minimum standards for the inspection or the report.
Finally, a certified vehicle must come with a warranty. The dealer may not sell a certified vehicle “AS IS” or disclaim the implied warranty of merchantability.-Cited from MADA Special Legal Bulletin

As a result of this law there is finally some accountability regarding the things checked in the “certification” process. But suffice it to say that paying $1400 more for a “certified pre-owned” car is usually not worth the money. If you are going to pay that much extra you’re better off getting a “manufacturer’s warranty type” service agreement (a.k.a. Extended Warranty) that covers actual repairs and roadside assistance for five to eight years or 100,000 miles, whichever comes first. Why pay more to know nothing is wrong now when 1) nothing should be wrong now anyway and 2) you can’t know what might go wrong in the future. Skip the “certified” game or AAA and add total piece of mind with a service agreement from the largest company in the US. Get it repaired not just relocated.

My Car Broke Down and I Need a Car Today. What Should I Do?
First off, don’t tell the typical dealer that this is your situation. Urgency means that you’re under extra pressure to buy today and that usually means you’ll pay more. The reality is, you don't need to buy today. If you haven’t had time to research vehicles and prices then do whatever you need to to make the time. Borrow a car, take time off of work or call Alliance Car Sales. Alliance will give you a car to use for up to two calender days and if you buy a car from us there will be no charges.* A rental car from Alliance can cost only about $30/day. Even if you rent a car for three days the money and anguish you save by making an informed decision is worth it. If you do rent a car try to get the model that you might want to purchase. What better way to have an extended test drive and be sure of your decision.

Call for details. Qualified customers only. Some restrictions apply.